Read what Dr. Randy Aronson, DVM, has to say about the benefits of using Arthroplex

100% Clean Products

From beginning to end, we provide the purest, highest quality pet nutraceuticals on the market.

We use the same mechanisms for pet health that we do for humans.

On the human side, Thorne Research (our mother company) is so well respected that we are the only supplement label allowed by the US Olympic Committee. We use the same mechanisms for pet health that we do for humans. We adhere to the same high level of manufacturing standards, transparency, and testing.
Thorne Vet supplements have the highest-quality ingredients and are manufactured 100% clean. That means there are no common allergens, no contaminants, no synthetic chemicals, and no additives (such as stearate) that can impede absorption or otherwise impact efficacy.

Clean. Pure. Transparent. Better.

  • Cleanest label on the market: Highest quality ingredients, manufactured 100% clean. No common allergens or contaminants.
  • Highest manufacturing standards: Including environmental sustainability considerations and ethical supply chain. All incoming ingredients are quarantined until tested and verified.
  • Total transparency: Manufactured in-house to ensure full supply chain transparency.
  • Better ingredients: Better ingredients means better potency, absorption, digestibility and ultimately, better animal health. We refuse to use magnesium stearate or any other ingredients that can inhibit absorption (even though many other companies do it because it’s easier).

Our Testing Multi-Factor Process:

Before a product achieves Thorne Vet's 100% clean label approval, it must meet our strict criteria for clinical research, origin, allergens, contaminants, and absorption. While most competitors test only once or twice, we have invested in two state-of-the-art laboratories that allow us to conduct four rounds of testing:

  • Round 1: Raw materials and components to screen for contaminants
  • Round 2: In-process batches to confirm consistency
  • Round 3: Final product to ensure potency and purity
  • Round 4: Stability to confirm the product will meet the label claim up to the product's time of expiration

Highest Manufacturing Standards

100% clean manufacturing ensured. We partner only with suppliers who practice quality, science, and responsibility, ensuring full supply chain transparency and quality-control. Our Summerville, South Carolina facility is third-party certified and exceeds all manufacturing standards set by these regulatory groups.

Better ingredients means better potency, absorption, digestibility and ultimately, better health.

All of our quality ingredients are ethically sourced & quarantined until tested.

Thorne Vet cares deeply about where our ingredients come from. We partner only with suppliers whose practices emphasize quality, science, and responsibility.

Just like for people, we have the same unacceptable ingredients for your pets.

Our NO list: Just like with our human products, these are ingredients you will never find in our pet supplements. All incoming ingredients are quarantined until tested and verified so you can be confident you are giving your pets a supplement that is truly healthy and healing.

The list of ingredients that will never be in our products includes, but is not limited to:

Acesulfame-K (Ace-K)
What it is / Why it's bad: An artificial sweetener. It has been linked to insulin resistance and high blood sugar.

Aspartame (Nutrasweet, Equal)
What it is / Why it's bad: An artificial sweetener. It has been linked to insulin resistance and high blood sugar.

Banned substances (By international athletic federations)
What it is / Why it's bad: Includes more than 200 substances (including anabolic agents, narcotics, and growth hormone secretagogues) that will disqualify an athlete from competition.

Benzoic acid
What it is / Why it's bad: Artificial preservatives. When mixed with vitamin C it can yield benzene, which is carcinogenic.

Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA)
An artificial antioxidant preservative. Carcinogenic, it accumulates in the lungs, liver, and kidneys and is associated with stomach tumors in animal studies.

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)
What it is / Why it's bad: An artificial antioxidant preservative. It accumulates in the liver, and is associated with liver tumors in animal studies.

Bisphenol A (BPA)
What it is / Why it's bad: A plasticizer used in water bottles and other plastic containers. It mimics estrogen in the body and can disrupt thyroid hormones, causing infertility, miscarriage, erectile dysfunction. Also can adversely influence fetal development and increase cancer risk.

Carmine (cochineal, natural red 4)
What it is / Why it's bad: A natural red/crimson dye. Made from female cochineal insects, it can cause allergic reactions and anaphylaxis.

Cyclamates
What it is / Why it's bad: Artificial sweeteners. They are allowed in Canada and Europe but banned in the U.S. (where the FDA has not found evidence of safety). Studies have associated them with bladder tumors in rodents and testicular atrophy and sperm disruption in monkeys

Ephedra sinica (Ma Huang)
What it is / Why it's bad: A botanical used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. It contains ephedrine, which was used and abused in weight loss products and banned in the U.S. Ephedra abuse can cause increased blood pressure, heart rate, and possibly heart attack and stroke.

Ethyl vanillin
What it is / Why it's bad: Artificial vanilla flavor more potent than vanillin, used to give chocolate a vanilla flavor. It is manufactured from petrochemicals and has been reported to cause allergic reactions and headaches in sensitive individuals

Ethylene oxide (ETO)
What it is / Why it's bad: Used to sterilize food, botanicals, and spices. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ETO as a Class 1 carcinogen. It is highly toxic to kidneys, liver, and nerves and is banned in the U.S.

FD&C numbered color pigments
What it is / Why it's bad: Artificial colors and dyes. They often contain aluminum, sometimes contain lead and mercury, and have been linked to cancer, hyperactivity, and allergies.

Glycols (propylene glycol)
What it is / Why it's bad: Used as solvents, sweeteners, and preservatives. They are allergenic and are a toxic to the kidneys, liver, and nervous system, and even more toxic to infants, who metabolize them slowly.

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
What it is / Why it's bad: A sweetener made from corn starch. It is a major contributor to fatty liver, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and inflammation, and can be contaminated with mercury.

Hydrogenated oils (partially hydrogenated oil, trans-fats)
What it is / Why it's bad: Oil fillers in softgels. Examples include partially hydrogenated soybean oil. Because trans-fats are associated with heart disease, stroke, diabetes and inflammation, the FDA removed them from its Generally Recognized As Safe list in 2015.

Irradiation
What it is / Why it's bad: Used to sterilize foods and botanicals. It is controversial because of the lack of long-term safety studies, and it has been banned for use in dietary supplements in the United States.

Nut-derived ingredients (tree nuts, peanuts)
What it is / Why it's bad: among the eight most common allergens. They can cause allergic reactions and anaphylaxis in people, and companion animals don't include nuts in their regular diets.

Polyethylene glycol (PEGs)
What it is / Why it's bad: Coating on tablets. Used to make tablets smooth and easier to swallow, it is often contaminated with carcinogens, including 1, 4, dioxane, ethylene oxide, and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

Polyethylene glycol (PEGs)
What it is / Why it's bad: Coating on tablets. Used to make tablets smooth and easier to swallow, it is often contaminated with carcinogens, including 1, 4, dioxane, ethylene oxide, and polycyclic aromatic compounds.

Saccharin (Sweet 'N Low, Sugar Twin)
What it is / Why it's bad: An artificial sweetener. It can cause bladder cancer in animals, and there are no strong studies proving safety in humans (only observational). As a sulfonamide it can also cause allergic reactions.

Sodium benzoate
What it is / Why it's bad: An artificial preservative. When mixed with vitamin C it can yield benzene, which is carcinogenic.

Sorbitol
What it is / Why it's bad: Sugar alcohol used as a sweetener. It can cause diarrhea, gas, and bloating.

Stearates (stearic acid, magnesium stearate)
What it is / Why it's bad: Manufacturing aids. They lubricate, help ingredients flow, and allow more material to be packed in a capsule. As long-chain fatty acids, they can inhibit the absorption of nutrients.

Sucralose (Splenda)
What it is / Why it's bad: An artificial sweetener. It has caused leukemia in animal studies and in humans is associated with bowel inflammation and a decrease in beneficial GI flora.

Sulfites (potassium bisulfite, sodium sulfite)
What it is / Why it's bad: Preservatives. Although they can occur naturally in foods, they are often added in manufacturing. They are allergenic and can cause severe asthmatic reactions in sulfite-sensitive individuals.

Synthetic Vanillin
What it is / Why it's bad: Artificial vanilla flavor. Natural vanillin is a constituent of vanilla. However, synthetic vanillin is used in imitation vanilla flavoring and is generally manufactured from petrochemicals. Another is from genetically modified yeast. It may trigger allergic reactions, GI upset, or migraines.

Tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ)
What it is / Why it's bad: A synthetic antioxidant related to BHA and BHT. It is tumorigenic and neurotoxic, and can cause liver enlargement.

Titanium dioxide
What it is / Why it's bad: A metallic colorant that makes ingredients white. It has been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a Class 2B carcinogen (i.e., "possibly carcinogenic to humans").

Using the same testing standards as our human products, all incoming ingredients are quarantined until tested and verified.

We test for 760 unique items.

Microorganisms

Arsenic

Mercury

Cadmium

Mold

Yeast

Coliforms

Salmonella

Ecoli

Leads

Heavy metals

Residual solvent

Pesticide residues

Benzopyrene

Organoleptic testing